DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.18203/2394-6040.ijcmph20203003

Nutritional status among children aged one to six years in tribal area

Palle Lokhnath Reddy, Aluka Anand Chand

Abstract


Background: Nutrition in children is considered as a major concern for good health and also for normal growth and development. The present study aimed to estimate the prevalence of malnutrition in 1 to 6 years children.

Methods: This was a community based cross sectional carried out in a south Indian tribal area for a period of 5 years among 1020 children. The anthropometric measurements categorization among children was done using world health organization (WHO) guidelines. Data was analyzed using microsoft excel 2010.

Results: Out of 1020 children, nutritional status based on underweight, stunting and wasting was 30.80%, 26.8% and 15.68% respectively. Severe degree of underweight, stunting and wasting was observed in 76.4%, 64.7% and 5.49% respectively.

Conclusions: Under nutrition was significantly high in infants and it decreased with increasing in age and significantly higher number of female children were stunted and underweight compared to male children.


Keywords


Nutrition, Underweight, Stunting, Obesity

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References


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